Posted by: Danielle Destrade | March 1, 2010

Review: ‘Last Train Home’

Photo from TrueFalse.Org

Sunday’s screening of “Last Train Home” felt like the last train for True/False attendees. Before the lights dimmed and the documentary came on the screen, the audience was buzzing with all the energy of the weekend.

After long, cold “Q”s and countless possible combinations of films watched, festival-goers converged at the Missouri Theatre for the official closing night film.

And yet, after the dark settled over everyone, and the opening scenes of “Last Train Home” flickered to life, it was as if it was the first film of the weekend.

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Posted by: Jonathan Hinderliter | March 1, 2010

Panel: Making films far from home

A panel of three filmmakers set out Sunday afternoon to discuss the problems of making films far from home.

After brief descriptions of each of their films, Mikael Wistrom (Familia), Simon Chambers (Cowboys in India), and Stefanie Brockhaus (The Other Side of Life) talked about power, transparency and purpose.

Power was a fascinating concept to these filmmakers. As each director explained the level of transparency they put into their films, they began to talk about the influence they had over the people they photographed. All of their films focused on lower classes, with many subjects agreeing to be filmed in order to have a bigger imprint on the world.

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Posted by: Megan Ogar | March 1, 2010

Review: ‘Familia’

It’s been a story 36 years in the making.

Swedish filmmaker Mikael Wiström first met the Barrientos family in 1974 when he left Sweden to explore the world. Amid a Peruvian trash dump, a beautiful couple raising a small baby in a tent near the heap struck Wiström.

He began to snap still photos of the family, and Natividad and Daniel Barrientos have captivated his attention ever since. Along with collaborative partner, Alberto Herskovits, he has created three films centered around their lives, the latest being Familia, shown at this weekend’s True False Festival.

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Posted by: matthewmkane | March 1, 2010

Review: Five films about identity crisis

Reviewing a collection of short films strung together under a common theme can be an incredibly daunting task.

Do you regard each film as a separate entity, removed from one another, thereby basing your criticism on the individual film? Or do you view the film as a collective effort and base their value against one another and the central theme, in this case “identity crisis”?

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Posted by: Katlyn Keller | March 1, 2010

Reader reviews: ‘Circo’ in one word

The Missourian is featuring reader contributions all weekend. If you’d like to submit your photos, stories or reviews, send them to submissions@mymissourian.com.

Viewers described “Circo” in one word outside of RagTag on Feb. 28.

Andrea Shoup

Christy and Mike Huggins

Posted by: Jie Yi See | February 28, 2010

My True/False: Day 4

The Missourian is featuring reader contributions all weekend. If you’d like to submit your photos, stories or reviews, send them to submissions@mymissourian.com.

Hear what True/False participants had to say on the fourth day of the film festival!

Editor’s note: Videos were taken by the participants themselves using a laptop camera.

Posted by: Haley Hastings | February 28, 2010

Reader review: ‘Cowboys in India’

Shared by Anna Beth Blevins, an advanced magazine writing student at MU. The Missourian is featuring reader contributions all weekend. If you’d like to submit your photos, stories or reviews, send them to submissions@mymissourian.com.

Filmmaker Simon Chambers’s hybrid documentary combines humor and horror to shed light on an aluminum mining company’s dastardly designs on a sacred mountain in rural India. The film keeps even the darkest moments light thanks to Chambers’s dynamic duo: Satya, the guide, and Doya, the driver. Together, these men become the Three Musketeers, but these musketeers are cruising around in a dangerous area that echoes more of the Wild West than France.

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Posted by: Haley Hastings | February 28, 2010

For first-time volunteer, community is the heart of T/F

Shared by Lauren Pinder, a festival volunteer and MU student. The Missourian is featuring reader contributions all weekend. If you’d like to submit your photos, stories or reviews, send them to submissions@mymissourian.com.

This was my first year volunteering at True/False. I don’t really know why I was so eager to give up my weekend to help out at the festival, but I guess it just seemed right to give back to a community from which I feel like I’ve received so much.

My favorite part of this weekend was getting to talk to and get to know so many people. For example, this morning I was sitting outside in the cold at around 9:00 giving out “Q” tickets at Ragtag. I spent half an hour talking to a man and a woman about the films they had seen that weekend. We shared recommendations, our thoughts on the films and filmmakers, the reasons we like this festival so much and how we were sad to see the weekend coming to an end. They asked what I studied at MU and ended up telling me a little about themselves in the meantime. By the time I had to go back inside to take tickets I felt like these people were my friends and I was bummed to have to leave them. Read More…

Posted by: Jordan Zirm | February 28, 2010

Review: ‘The Oath’

The picture on the promotional poster for “The Oath” is a perfect metaphor for the thought-provoking documentary directed by Laura Poitras.

We see a picture of a man looking into the rear view mirror of his cab, his eyes seemingly lost in the past. Throughout the film, we find this man is haunted by his former life, and as he stares into the mirror, looking behind him, it is fitting that  the past dominates his future. Read More…

Posted by: mariahhenry | February 28, 2010

Panel: How can films inspire social change?

Directors Josh Fox (“GasLand”) and Carter Gunn (“Colony”) showed clips from their movies at the Columbia Art League on Sunday and then turned to an interactive format by asking the audience to help develop strategies for turning documentary concepts into global action.

They were part of a session arranged by The Fledgling Fund. The fund’s senior program officer, Emily Verellen, said the organization’s main goal is to spark social change through creative media.

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